On the death of this Russian grandmother talked on all TV channels in Japan

On the death of this Russian grandmother talked on all TV channels in Japan

On the last journey, the 94-year-old Claudius Novikova was escorted by just a few people: there were almost no relatives left, the friends also had long since departed into another world. But in Japan, the death of a resident of the village of Progress was announced on central TV channels: "The Russian wife Yasaburo-san died."

Dozens of newspaper articles, several books, films and even a play have been written about the life of Klavdiya Novikova. In Japan, this Russian woman became a symbol of love and sacrifice. Having lived with her husband for 37 years, she herself persuaded him to return to his homeland, to his relatives and wife, who had been waiting for her Yasaburo-san for more than half a century.

Claudia and Yasaburo met in 1959. Both of them had the hard years of the Stalin camps behind their backs: she served seven years for someone else's embezzlement, he is like a Japanese spy for ten years. And each of them had their own pain. Claudia married before the war, gave birth to a son, waited, like everyone else, from the front of her husband.But when she was convicted and exiled to Kolyma, her husband who had returned from the war started a new family.

No less tragic was the fate of Yasaburo Khachia. Before the war, he left Japan together with his young wife and moved to Korea in search of a better life. There he was born a son and daughter. But when in the fall of 1945 Soviet troops entered Korea, most of the Japanese were arrested on suspicion of spying against the Soviet Union. Yasaburo was given ten years, which he spent in the same place as Claudius, near Magadan.

Since then, his family, he no longer saw. When the Japanese subject was released from the camp, his family name was simply forgotten to be added to the lists of prisoners of war who were sent to their homeland. Yasaburo had nowhere to return, he was sure that his wife and children had died. And he was also afraid, after long years spent in the Soviet Union, to return to Japan, so he took Soviet citizenship and became Yakov Ivanovich.

- We met in the Bryansk region, where we were at the settlement. I saw Yasha: a non-Russian face, thin, clogged, and in the eyes of such a pressing melancholy, that my heart sank with pity, - then Klavdia Leonidovna later recalled. - At the beginning of the sixties, an acquaintance called me to move to the Far East, to the Progress settlement, and I left.Yasha wrote that she wanted to be with me, but I refused - she was afraid, and she confessed only to a close friend that she was in correspondence with the former military prisoner.

Yasaburo still arrived. They got married and lived together for 37 years. He became a hairdresser, photographed, acupuncture. Together with his Russian wife he grew tomatoes and cucumbers, brought goats and bees. They lived very modestly, but amicably and calmly - Yakov Ivanovich did not even raise voices for his wife.

But God did not give them children. “There are no more men like my Yasha in the district.” Women envied me: he did not drink, did not smoke, ”said Claudia about her husband. They hoped to die in one day. Already being retired and arriving, Yakov Ivanovich brought two coffins: he disassembled according to prostochka, dried, re-hammer and dragged into the attic. But they were not needed.

When perestroika began and the iron curtain fell, one of the family’s friends told an relative of Progress, an unusual resident, to a relative from Primorye who was engaged in common business with the Japanese. The Japanese partners, having learned the details of his compatriot’s youth, organized a search for his relatives. And they first found a brother, then ... a wife and daughter.

Hisako faithfully waited for her husband for 51 years: she returned home with her daughter (her son died in Korea), worked as a nurse and all her life saved money from her meager income to build a modest house. She built a house for her husband, writing property in his name, and even opened a bank account for Yasaburo, although she didn’t know if he was alive or if he would return. When the husband was found, their daughter Kumiko was already over fifty.

Yakov Ivanovich’s daughter and brother came to Progress to persuade him to return to his homeland. But he refused. “I cannot leave you, you are everything to me,” he said to his Russian wife. And then Claudia Leonidovna decided to send her husband to Japan herself - she understood that he would not live here for a long time, because she was very sick, and there the conditions for the elderly were much better. And his Japanese wife Hisako should at least see and embrace her husband before her death.

Claudia Leonidovna herself made a passport for Yakov Ivanovich, changed her savings for dollars and ... she divorced, otherwise there, at home, he could not claim retirement, property and inheritance. And in March 1997, I said goodbye to my beloved person forever.

Yasaburo constantly sent her small gifts from Japan, he called every Saturday and invited her to visit him.A famous Japanese writer wrote a book about Klavdiya Novikova, television journalists shot a film, and the Amur woman became known in the country. In the prefecture of Tattori, a suburb of Tokyo, the whole world raised money for the trip of “the woman of Klava” to Japan, and when she decided to come (she was already over eighty) to come, she became almost a national heroine there. At the same time, Claudia Leonidovna first met the Japanese wife of her Yasha: they embraced and cried - they didn't even need a translator to understand each other.

Then a resident of Progress was twice in the Land of the Rising Sun, including at a performance created on the basis of the fate of a Russian woman and a Japanese prisoner of war. And in each of her visits, Yasaburo persuaded him to stay with him - his Japanese wife Hisako died, and in every telephone conversation he asked to go back to Progress. But Claudia Leonidovna refused all the time: she wanted her Yasha "to live in dignity." And she lived rather modestly, alone, relying only on her own strength.

“She was very active to the last — last year she herself dug up and planted her garden,” says Alexey Rodya, one of the few who knew his fellow villager well.

Alexey Isaakovich met Claudia Leonidovna and Yakov Ivanovich about thirty years ago, they talked with their families. When Yasaburo left for Japan, he asked his friends to help his wife. His request Alexey Isaakovich and Lyubov Stepanovna Rodya performed and were with woman Klava until her last days. They organized a decent funeral.

According to Alexei Isaakovich, Claudia Leonidovna left this world happy: her beloved Yasha was alive, and lately her granddaughter Larisa began visiting her. Yes, Novikova has two granddaughters - the daughter of a son, whom she gave birth to in her first marriage. Their relationship did not work out, according to rumors, the man drank heavily and died at 64. His daughters almost didn’t communicate with their grandmother, and only shortly before her death did one of the women living in Progress visit Baba Klava.

When Japan became aware of the death of Claudia Novikova, several letters came to Progress, including from Yasaburo himself.

He spoke to her as if it were alive: “Claudia! I learned that you were gone, and sorrow overcomes me. I tried to reach you on August 30, the day of my 96th birthday, but I failed. All the forty years that I have lived with you in Russia, you have always been with me, always supported me.Thank you for everything ... I was able to return to Japan only thanks to your efforts, and I am immensely grateful to you for that. I remember how we even made coffins for two in your homeland. If it were in my power, I would like to rush to you and squeeze you to my heart tightly ... But I am powerless ... Sleep well, dear Claudia. Your Yasaburo. "

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  • On the death of this Russian grandmother talked on all TV channels in Japan

    On the death of this Russian grandmother talked on all TV channels in Japan

    On the death of this Russian grandmother talked on all TV channels in Japan

    On the death of this Russian grandmother talked on all TV channels in Japan

    On the death of this Russian grandmother talked on all TV channels in Japan

    On the death of this Russian grandmother talked on all TV channels in Japan

    On the death of this Russian grandmother talked on all TV channels in Japan

    On the death of this Russian grandmother talked on all TV channels in Japan

    On the death of this Russian grandmother talked on all TV channels in Japan

    On the death of this Russian grandmother talked on all TV channels in Japan

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